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    Tag: centrifugal pump

    What are the Different Types of Centrifugal Pumps?

    Centrifugal pumps are currently utilized across a vast array of domestic and industrial processes. From supplying the water used in residential buildings to industrial applications like food, beverage, and chemical manufacturing, different types of centrifugal pumps are required to effectively meet pumping requirements. The centrifugal pumps can be classified based on many factors such as construction, design, application and industrial standards. Therefore, one centrifugal pump can be placed into different groups at the same time. In this article, we will introduce three classifications of centrifugal pumps.

    Why Choose a Centrifugal Water Pump?

    Centrifugal pumps are used to transport fluids by the conversion of rotational kinetic energy to the hydrodynamic energy of the fluid flow. The rotational energy typically comes from an engine or electric motor. They are a sub-class of dynamic axisymmetric work-absorbing turbomachinery. The fluid enters the pump impeller along or near to the rotating axis and is accelerated by the impeller, flowing radially outward into a diffuser or volute chamber (casing), from which it exits. Common uses include water, sewage, agriculture, petroleum, and petrochemical pumping. 

    Centrifugal Pump: Working Principle, Advantages, Maintenance and Application

    A centrifugal pump is a mechanical device designed to move a fluid by means of the transfer of rotational energy from one or more driven rotors, called impellers. Fluid enters the rapidly rotating impeller along its axis and is cast out by centrifugal force along its circumference through the impeller's vane tips.

    How to Choose a Centrifugal Pump?

    A centrifugal pump is a mechanical device designed to move fluid by transferring rotational energy from one or more driven rotors, called impellers. Fluid enters the rapidly rotating impeller along its axis and exits through the impeller's blade tips along its circumference by centrifugal force. The action of the impeller increases the velocity and pressure of the fluid and directs it towards the pump outlet. The pump casing is specially designed to compress the fluid from the pump inlet, direct it to the impeller, and then slow and control the fluid before discharging.

    Horizontal Centrifugal Pump vs. Vertical Centrifugal Pump

    We all know vertical centrifugal pumps and horizontal centrifugal pumps, both of which are centrifugal pumps. It can be used in everyone's daily life. So what is the difference between these two pumps? And what are the differences? For this issue, ATO.com will give you a brief explanation so that you can have a more detailed understanding of these two pumps.

    What are Parts & Functions of a Centrifugal Water Pump?

    Centrifugal pumps are widely used in electric power production, because of their wide range of performance (including flow, pressure head and loss of media properties), small size, simple structure, easy operation, uniform flow, long life, Prominent advantages such as lower acquisition costs and lower operating costs. There are many varieties of centrifugal pumps. Although the structures of various types of pumps are different, the main components are basically the same. The main components of the centrifugal pump include: impeller, pump shaft, pump casing, pump seat, stuffing box (shaft seal device), leakage reducing ring, bearing seat, etc.

    Centrifugal Pump: How Does it Work?

    Centrifugal pump refers to a pump that transports liquid by the centrifugal force generated by the rotation of the impeller. Centrifugal pumps are widely used and are almost indispensable equipment in process systems. The small size, simple operation and long service life of the centrifugal pump are the outstanding advantages of the centrifugal pump. If the pipeline delivery system is regarded as the vascular circulation system of the human body, then the centrifugal pump is equivalent to the heart that transports blood.

    What is a Centrifugal Pump?

    A centrifugal pump is a mechanical device designed to move fluid by transferring rotational energy from one or more driven rotors, called impellers. Fluid enters the rapidly rotating impeller along its axis and exits through the impeller's blade tips along its circumference by centrifugal force. The action of the impeller increases the velocity and pressure of the fluid and directs it towards the pump outlet. The pump casing is specially designed to compress the fluid from the pump inlet, direct it to the impeller, and then slow and control the fluid before discharging.